Balancing Natural & Human Ecosystems

Balancing Natural & Human Ecosystems

Balancing Natural & Human Ecosystems

Balancing natural &
human ecosystems

Organization for
Indigenous Outreach
& Conservation

Organization for
Indigenous Outreach
& Conservation

Organization for
Indigenous
Outreach &
Conservation

Organization for
Indigenous Outreach
& Conservation

Balancing Natural & Human Ecosystems

Organization for
Indigenous Outreach &
Conservation

MISSION

Environmental reforestation of Amazonian foothills.


Reciprocity for indigenous wisdom and medicines.

Environmental reforestation of Amazonian foothills.


Reciprocity for indigenous wisdom and medicines.

Environmental reforestation of Amazonian foothills.


Support of indigenous peoples and medicines.

Environmental reforestation of Amazonian foothills.


Reciprocity for indigenous wisdom and medicines.

SUMMARY

The Amazonian foothills of Sibundoy, Colombia is a highly biodiverse Andean valley¹, home to the Putumayo River and the indigenous Kamëntsá people, who've stewarded 350+ native plant medicines over 3,000 years, including yagé (Ayahuasca)—which is increasingly studied and used in today’s global psychedelic movement.²


Only 3% of Sibundoy’s native ecosystem remains (forests, wetlands, semi-natural areas), most turned over to monoculture and livestock farming.³ Construction of an IIRSA international highway proposes clearing 12,000 hectares of forest, further threatening biodiversity and social structures of Amazon communities, living in constant danger of flooding and landslides. 79% of the local population live in poverty, burdened by the costs of synthetic industrial agriculture, and the lack of education on indigenous food systems.⁴


OIOC (Organization for Indigenous Outreach & Conservation) is an indigenous-led non-profit based in Sibundoy. On resguardos (indigenous protected lands), we regenerate native species through ancestral and modern methods, preserve and cultivate native foods and natural medicines, and propose income-generating projects aligned with ecological and socio-cultural health.


After completing a smaller reforestation effort of 500 trees, repairing homes for 24 families, and building a community temple, we're raising funds to scale our reforestation, ethnobotanical conservation, and sustainable livelihood projects for the next five years.

The Amazonian foothills of Sibundoy, Colombia is a highly biodiverse Andean valley¹, home to the Putumayo River and the indigenous Kamëntsá people, who've stewarded 350+ native plant medicines over 3,000 years, including yagé (Ayahuasca)—which is increasingly studied and used in today’s global psychedelic movement.²


Only 3% of Sibundoy’s native ecosystem remains (forests, wetlands, semi-natural areas), most turned over to monoculture and livestock farming.³ Construction of an IIRSA international highway proposes clearing 12,000 hectares of forest, further threatening biodiversity and social structures of Amazon communities, living in constant danger of flooding and landslides. 79% of the local population live in poverty, burdened by the costs of synthetic industrial agriculture, and the lack of education on indigenous food systems.⁴


OIOC (Organization for Indigenous Outreach & Conservation) is an indigenous-led non-profit based in Sibundoy. On resguardos (indigenous protected lands), we regenerate native species through ancestral and modern methods, preserve and cultivate native foods and natural medicines, and propose income-generating projects aligned with ecological and socio-cultural health.


After completing a smaller reforestation effort of 500 trees, repairing homes for 24 families, and building a community temple, we're raising funds to scale our reforestation, ethnobotanical conservation, and sustainable livelihood projects for the next five years.

The Amazonian foothills of Sibundoy, Colombia is a highly biodiverse Andean valley¹, home to the Putumayo River and the indigenous Kamëntsá people, who've stewarded 350+ native plant medicines over 3,000 years, including yagé (Ayahuasca)—which is increasingly studied and used in today’s global psychedelic movement.²


Only 3% of Sibundoy’s native ecosystem remains (forests, wetlands, semi-natural areas), most turned over to monoculture and livestock farming.³ Construction of an IIRSA international highway proposes clearing 12,000 hectares of forest, further threatening biodiversity and social structures of Amazon communities, living in constant danger of flooding and landslides. 79% of the local population live in poverty, burdened by the costs of synthetic industrial agriculture, and the lack of education on indigenous food systems.⁴


OIOC (Organization for Indigenous Outreach & Conservation) is an indigenous-led non-profit based in Sibundoy. On resguardos (indigenous protected lands), we regenerate native species through ancestral and modern methods, preserve and cultivate native foods and natural medicines, and propose income-generating projects aligned with ecological and socio-cultural health.


After completing a smaller reforestation effort of 500 trees, repairing homes for 24 families, and building a community temple, we're raising funds to scale our reforestation, ethnobotanical conservation, and sustainable livelihood projects for the next five years.

CURRENT CAMPAIGN

Green Rebirth

Green Rebirth

Green Rebirth

Green Rebirth

5-Year Proposal to Restore Biodiversity in the Amazon foothills and Essencial food needs in the Kamëntsá Indigenous Community

5-Year Proposal to Restore Biodiversity and Livelihoods in the Kamëntsá Indigenous Community

FUNDING GOALS

Reforestation Y1 - Y5

$350,000 Y1

$2,420,000 Y1 - Y5

Reforesting 439 hectares of Indigenous Rerservation over 5 years. Creating income streams (carbon credits, agroforestry goods, ethnobotanical extracts) and food forests for local community.

Reforestation Y1 - Y5

$350,000 Y1

$2,420,000 Y1 - Y5

Reforesting 439 hectares of Indigenous Rerservation over 5 years. Creating income streams (carbon credits, agroforestry goods, ethnobotanical extracts) and food forests for local community.

Reforestation Y1 - Y5

$350,000 Y1

$2,420,000 Y1 - Y5

Reforesting 439 hectares of Indigenous Rerservation over 5 years. Creating income streams (carbon credits, agroforestry goods, ethnobotanical extracts) and food forests for local community.

Reforestation Y1 - Y5

$350,000 Y1

$2,420,000 Y1 - Y5

Reforesting 439 hectares of Indigenous Rerservation over 5 years. Creating income streams (carbon credits, agroforestry goods, ethnobotanical extracts) and food forests for local community.

Reforestation Y1 - Y5

$350,000 Y1

$2,420,000 Y1 - Y5

Reforesting 439 hectares of Indigenous Rerservation over 5 years. Creating income streams (carbon credits, agroforestry goods, ethnobotanical extracts) and food forests for local community.

Greenhouse, Y1

$42,800

Large-scale capacity for 150,000 trees a year, supporting annual reforestation efforts and seeds and trees for chagra forestry — an indigenous agriculture practice replicating natural forests to produce food, wood, and medicines for local families.

Greenhouse, Y1

$42,800

Large-scale capacity for 150,000 trees a year, supporting annual reforestation efforts and seeds and trees for chagra forestry — an indigenous agriculture practice replicating natural forests to produce food, wood, and medicines for local families.

Greenhouse, Y1

$42,800

Large-scale capacity for 150,000 trees a year, supporting annual reforestation efforts and seeds and trees for chagra forestry — an indigenous agriculture practice replicating natural forests to produce food, wood, and medicines for local families.

Greenhouse, Y1

$42,800

Large-scale capacity for 150,000 trees a year, supporting annual reforestation efforts and seeds and trees for chagra forestry — an indigenous agriculture practice replicating natural forests to produce food, wood, and medicines for local families.

Greenhouse, Y1

$42,800

Large-scale capacity for 150,000 trees a year, supporting annual reforestation efforts and seeds and trees for chagra forestry — an indigenous agriculture practice replicating natural forests to produce food, wood, and medicines for local families.

Research Center for Plant Medicine, Y2

$168,500

Laboratory for research, education, and development of plant medicines. Inviting the scientific community to collaborate with indigenous knowledge of 350+ medicinal plants (ayahuasca, guayusa, sacha inchi, etc) towards holistic health. Capacity to produce medicinal tinctures and extracts for mental health, energy, detoxification, etc. Ethnobotanical income stream.

Research Center for Plant Medicine, Y2

$168,500

Laboratory for research, education, and development of plant medicines. Inviting the scientific community to collaborate with indigenous knowledge of 350+ medicinal plants (ayahuasca, guayusa, sacha inchi, etc) towards holistic health. Capacity to produce medicinal tinctures and extracts for mental health, energy, detoxification, etc. Ethnobotanical income stream.

Research Center for Plant Medicine, Y2

$168,500

Laboratory for research, education, and development of plant medicines. Inviting the scientific community to collaborate with indigenous knowledge of 350+ medicinal plants (ayahuasca, guayusa, sacha inchi, etc) towards holistic health. Capacity to produce medicinal tinctures and extracts for mental health, energy, detoxification, etc. Ethnobotanical income stream.

Research Center for Plant Medicine, Y2

$168,500

Laboratory for research, education, and development of plant medicines. Inviting the scientific community to collaborate with indigenous knowledge of 350+ medicinal plants (ayahuasca, guayusa, sacha inchi, etc) towards holistic health. Capacity to produce medicinal tinctures and extracts for mental health, energy, detoxification, etc. Ethnobotanical income stream.

Research Center for Plant Medicine, Y2

$168,500

Laboratory for research, education, and development of plant medicines. Inviting the scientific community to collaborate with indigenous knowledge of 350+ medicinal plants (ayahuasca, guayusa, sacha inchi, etc) towards holistic health. Capacity to produce medicinal tinctures and extracts for mental health, energy, detoxification, etc. Ethnobotanical income stream.

IMPACT

Environmental & social well-being

Environmental & social well-being

Environmental & social well-being

150,000


425,000


425,000


425,000

Trees Planted, Y3

Trees Planted, Y5

Trees Planted, Y5

Trees Planted, Y5

Greenhouse supports 25,000 - 150,000 species annually, a first of its size and largest conservation capacity in the area.

3,969

3,969

3,969

Kamëntsá People

Directly impacted through community workshops (cultural heritage, language, ecology), greenhouse and lab access, and chagras on family plots.

Directly benefitting through community workshops (cultural heritage, language, ecology), jobs, greenhouse and lab access, and chagras on family plots.

Directly benefitting through community workshops (cultural heritage, language, ecology), jobs, greenhouse and lab access, and chagras on family plots.

Directly benefitting through community workshops (cultural heritage, language, ecology), jobs, greenhouse and lab access, and chagras on family plots.

4

4

4

Income Sources

Agroforestry and greenhouse products, carbon credits, and ethnobotanical extracts—aligned with ecology and culture, all accessible to the community.

Water & Climate Security

Reforesting 439 hectares (1035) acres over 5 years. Reforestation maintains watersheds and aquifers for human, animal, and plant activities.

Reforesting 439 hectares (1035) acres over 5 years. Reforestation regulates carbon and hydrological cycles, and maintains aquifers for human, animal, and plant activities.

Reforesting 439 hectares (1035) acres over 5 years. Reforestation regulates carbon and hydrological cycles, and maintains aquifers for human, animal, and plant activities.

Reforesting 439 hectares (1035) acres over 5 years. Reforestation regulates carbon and hydrological cycles, and maintains aquifers for human, animal, and plant activities.

Chagra Forestry

Cultural Preservation

Cultural Preservation

Cultural Preservation

Regenerating native forests and the community around them by planting successional canopies that provide food, water, medicines, and climate support.

Revitalizing indigenous practices like chagra forestry (planting successional canopies that provide food, water, medicines, and climate support), and merging ethnobotanical research with modern scientific inquiry.

Revitalizing indigenous practices like chagra forestry (planting successional canopies that provide food, water, medicines, and climate support), and merging ethnobotanical research with modern scientific inquiry.

Revitalizing indigenous practices like chagra forestry (planting successional canopies that provide food, water, medicines, and climate support), and merging ethnobotanical research with modern scientific inquiry.

TIMELINE & BUDGET

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Expand Greenhouse

$42,800

Germination, Substrates, & Maintenance

$43,700

Field & Community Study

$24,200

Community Education

18,000

Soil Regeneration

$25,200

Reforestation Field Work

$47,000

Project Management

$36,000

Tools

$6,700

Fundraising, Donor Outreach

$15,600

Explore Income Streams

$25,000

Research & Technology

$15,000

Documentation

$25,000

Accountant

$10,800

Y1 Total, Includes Greenhouse

$349,143

Research Center for Education and Transformation of Plant Medicine, Y2

$168,500

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Expand Greenhouse

$42,800

Germination, Substrates, & Maintenance

$43,700

Field & Community Study

$24,200

Community Education

18,000

Soil Regeneration

$25,200

Reforestation Field Work

$47,000

Project Management

$36,000

Tools

$6,700

Fundraising, Donor Outreach

$15,600

Explore Income Streams

$25,000

Research & Technology

$15,000

Documentation

$25,000

Accountant

$10,800

Y1 Total, Includes Greenhouse

$349,143

Research Center for Education and Transformation of Plant Medicine, Y2

$168,500

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
MONTH
MO.
MO.
ITEM
DESCRIPTION

1 - 3

Build Greenhouse

Build Greenhouse
$42,800

Build Greenhouse

$42,800

Build Greenhouse

$42,800

27m x 30m greenhouse producing 25,000 - 100,000 species a year, like native trees, palms, hydrophytes, and food forestry flora.

1 - 3

Technical Field Data

Technical Field Data
$7,000

Technical Field Data

$7,000

Technical Field Data

$7,000

Identify and document 70 endangered waterways & ecosystems in the Indigenous reservation for reforestation.

1 - 3

Community Field Data

Community Field Data
$7,000

Community Field Data

$7,000

Community Field Data

$7,000

Identify 70 families of the Indigenous reservation to participate in chaga forestry on their lands.

1

Tools

Tools $6,700

Tools
$6,700

Tools
$6,700

Reforestation Tools for 6 Field Workers

3 - 12

Germination, Bed Prep, Substrates, Maintenance

Germination, Bed Prep, Substrates, Maintenance
$43,700 

Germination, Bed Prep, Substrates, Maintenance

$43,700 

Germination, Bed Prep, Substrates, Maintenance

$43,700 

Materials, and labor for ongoing cultivation: preparing substrates for seed beds; greenhouse watering, transplanting, and monitoring.

2 - 8

Soil Regeneration, Land Movement on Sites

Soil Regeneration, Land Movement on Sites
$25,200

Soil Regeneration, Land Movement on Sites

$25,200

Soil Regeneration, Land Movement on Sites

$25,200

Soil regeneration by adding biomass and microorganisms to decompose and enrich the soil. ~$1800 per hectare at 14 hectares, Y1.

9 - 12

Reforestation

Reforestation $7,000

Reforestation

$7,000

Reforestation

$7,000

Planting 70 reforestation sites and 70 chagra forestry family plots. Digging and field work.

1 - 12

Fundraising, Donor Outreach

Fundraising, Donor Outreach
$15,600

Fundraising, Donor Outreach

$15,600

Fundraising, Donor Outreach

$15,600

Government, political, and international outreach efforts. Advocate for OIOC with national and regional authorities (environmental and indigenous departments) and international donors.

1 - 4

Research, Technology

Research, Technology
$15,000

Research, Technology
$15,000

Research, Technology
$15,000

Aggregating and distilling data for initial operational proposal; web design and development; operational software (web fees, plugins, task management). 

3 - 12

Community Education

Community Education
$18,000

Community Education
$18,000

Community Education
$18,000

Local workshops for indigenous communities to learn sustainable ecology, chagra forestry, reforestation practices, and forestry-based income activities. 

1 - 12

Project Management

Project Management
$36,000

Project Management
$36,000

Project Management
$36,000

Reporting, local project management (contracting, labor, payments, timeline), partnerships and outreach, and educational content are also included.

4 - 12

Documentation

Documentation
$25,000

Documentation
$25,000

Documentation
$25,000

Media (images, videos) of our work, drafting documentation and case studies for academic articles, newsroom updates, donor follow-ups, and annual reports.

1 - 12

Accountant

Accountant $10,800

Accountant
$10,800

Accountant
$10,800

Track all inflows and outflows, $1500 per month

7 - 12

Explore Income Streams

Explore Income Streams
$25,000

Explore Income Streams
$25,000

Explore Income Streams
$25,000

Research agroforestry products/services and the market. Use tools and machines to harvest and produce goods. Set up distribution channels. 

IMPACT

Environmental & social well-being

425,000


425,000


Trees Planted by Y5

Greenhouse supports 25,000 - 150,000 species annually, a first of its size and largest conservation capacity in the area.

Water & Climate Security

Reforesting 439 hectares (1035) acres over 5 years. Reforestation regulates carbon and hydrological cycles, and maintains aquifers for human, animal, and plant activities.

3,969

3,969

Kamëntsá People

Directly benefitting through community workshops (cultural heritage, language, ecology), jobs, greenhouse and lab access, and chagras on family plots.

4

4

Income Sources

Agroforestry and greenhouse products, carbon credits, and ethnobotanical extracts—aligned with ecology and culture, all accessible to the community.

Cultural Preservation

Revitalizing indigenous practices like chagra forestry (planting successional canopies that provide food, water, medicines, and climate support, and merging ethnobotanical research with modern scientific inquiry.

Revitalizing indigenous practices like chagra forestry (planting successional canopies that provide food, water, medicines, and climate support), and merging ethnobotanical research with modern scientific inquiry.

SPONSORS

Circle of Sacred Nature

Alcaldía de Sibundoy

Shanayoy

Support OIOC's reforestation, ethnobotanical research, and indigenous support efforts in Sibundoy, Colombia.

Support OIOC's reforestation, ethnobotanical research, and indigenous support efforts in Sibundoy, Colombia.

Support OIOC's reforestation, ethnobotanical research, and indigenous support efforts in Sibundoy, Colombia.

We're raising $350,000 for our first year of reforestation + construction of greenhouse, and $168,500 to construct a Research Center for Plant Medicine and a market-ready line of ethnobotanical medicinal extracts.

We're raising $350,000 for our first year of reforestation + construction of greenhouse, and $168,500 to construct a Research Center for Plant Medicine and a market-ready line of ethnobotanical medicinal extracts.

We're raising $350,000 for our first year of reforestation + construction of greenhouse, and $168,500 to construct a Research Center for Plant Medicine and a market-ready line of ethnobotanical medicinal extracts.

TEAM

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Kamentsa Tribal Governor Founder

3x Governor of Kamëntsá nation. Indigenous-born, 40+ year experience with Amazonian medicines, lineage of traditional Yageceros. Taita Juan is deeply connected to the natural world and committed to its conservation, dedicating his lifetime to indigenous advocacy and the preservation of natural medicines and ecosystems, through his work at OIOC, Shanayoy, regionally, and speaking abroad.

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Kamentsa Tribal Governor Founder

3x Governor of Kamëntsá nation. Indigenous-born, 40+ year experience with Amazonian medicines, lineage of traditional Yageceros. Taita Juan is deeply connected to the natural world and committed to its conservation, dedicating his lifetime to indigenous advocacy and the preservation of natural medicines and ecosystems, through his work at OIOC, Shanayoy, regionally, and speaking abroad.

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Kamentsa Tribal Governor Founder

3x Governor of Kamëntsá nation. Indigenous-born, 40+ year experience with Amazonian medicines, lineage of traditional Yageceros. Taita Juan is deeply connected to the natural world and committed to its conservation, dedicating his lifetime to indigenous advocacy and the preservation of natural medicines and ecosystems, through his work at OIOC, Shanayoy, regionally, and speaking abroad.

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Kamentsa Tribal Governor Founder

3x Governor of Kamëntsá nation. Indigenous-born, 40+ year experience with Amazonian medicines, lineage of traditional Yageceros. Taita Juan is deeply connected to the natural world and committed to its conservation, dedicating his lifetime to indigenous advocacy and the preservation of natural medicines and ecosystems, through his work at OIOC, Shanayoy, regionally, and speaking abroad.

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Kamentsa Tribal Governor Founder

3x Governor of Kamëntsá nation. Indigenous-born, 40+ year experience with Amazonian medicines, lineage of traditional Yageceros. Taita Juan is deeply connected to the natural world and committed to its conservation, dedicating his lifetime to indigenous advocacy and the preservation of natural medicines and ecosystems, through his work at OIOC, Shanayoy, regionally, and speaking abroad.

Erika Salazar
Executive Director Founder

20+ years studying traditions and people of the Andes. Studied Master Plants under Taita Juan, organized non-profit work for the region since 2011. Attuned to the natural world, Erika leads the heartbeat of the organization, from local operational planning to international outreach. Medical Herbalist (Vitalist Tradition), Holistic Therapist (University Esneca, Spain), Minister (Circle of Sacred Nature).

Erika Salazar
Executive Director Founder

20+ years studying traditions and people of the Andes. Studied Master Plants under Taita Juan, organized non-profit work for the region since 2011. Attuned to the natural world, Erika leads the heartbeat of the organization, from local operational planning to international outreach. Medical Herbalist (Vitalist Tradition), Holistic Therapist (University Esneca, Spain), Minister (Circle of Sacred Nature).

Erika Salazar
Executive Director Founder

20+ years studying traditions and people of the Andes. Studied Master Plants under Taita Juan, organized non-profit work for the region since 2011. Attuned to the natural world, Erika leads the heartbeat of the organization, from local operational planning to international outreach. Medical Herbalist (Vitalist Tradition), Holistic Therapist (University Esneca, Spain), Minister (Circle of Sacred Nature).

Erika Salazar
Executive Director Founder

20+ years studying traditions and people of the Andes. Studied Master Plants under Taita Juan, organized non-profit work for the region since 2011. Attuned to the natural world, Erika leads the heartbeat of the organization, from local operational planning to international outreach. Medical Herbalist (Vitalist Tradition), Holistic Therapist (University Esneca, Spain), Minister (Circle of Sacred Nature).

Erika Salazar
Executive Director Founder

20+ years studying traditions and people of the Andes. Studied Master Plants under Taita Juan, organized non-profit work for the region since 2011. Attuned to the natural world, Erika leads the heartbeat of the organization, from local operational planning to international outreach. Medical Herbalist (Vitalist Tradition), Holistic Therapist (University Esneca, Spain), Minister (Circle of Sacred Nature).

Mercedes Agreda
Founder - Community Educator

A proud member of the Kamëntsá people, Mercedes embodies a deep reverence for the earth and our sacred elements. Community Educator since 2016, she hosts programs in ancestral medicines, traditional arts & culture, and land conservation to the local community. Faculty student of Madre Tierra at University of Antioquia.

Mercedes Agreda
Founder - Community Educator

A proud member of the Kamëntsá people, Mercedes embodies a deep reverence for the earth and our sacred elements. Community Educator since 2016, she hosts programs in ancestral medicines, traditional arts & culture, and land conservation to the local community. Faculty student of Madre Tierra at University of Antioquia.

Mercedes Agreda
Founder - Community Educator

A proud member of the Kamëntsá people, Mercedes embodies a deep reverence for the earth and our sacred elements. Community Educator since 2016, she hosts programs in ancestral medicines, traditional arts & culture, and land conservation to the local community. Faculty student of Madre Tierra at University of Antioquia.

Mercedes Agreda
Founder - Community Educator

A proud member of the Kamëntsá people, Mercedes embodies a deep reverence for the earth and our sacred elements. Community Educator since 2016, she hosts programs in ancestral medicines, traditional arts & culture, and land conservation to the local community. Faculty student of Madre Tierra at University of Antioquia.

Mercedes Agreda
Founder - Community Educator

A proud member of the Kamëntsá people, Mercedes embodies a deep reverence for the earth and our sacred elements. Community Educator since 2016, she hosts programs in ancestral medicines, traditional arts & culture, and land conservation to the local community. Faculty student of Madre Tierra at University of Antioquia.

Nicholas Busciglio
Grounds Manager Founder

Adopted into the ancestral lands of the Kamëntsá people, Nico bridges modern mindsets with ancestral wisdom. With a background in filmmaking, art, and social work, Nico brings artistic expression and sensitivity to storytelling and outreach, and manages local field teams and the greenhouse alongside Andres.

Nicholas Busciglio
Grounds Manager Founder

Adopted into the ancestral lands of the Kamëntsá people, Nico bridges modern mindsets with ancestral wisdom. With a background in filmmaking, art, and social work, Nico brings artistic expression and sensitivity to storytelling and outreach, and manages local field teams and the greenhouse alongside Andres.

Nicholas Busciglio
Grounds Manager Founder

Adopted into the ancestral lands of the Kamëntsá people, Nico bridges modern mindsets with ancestral wisdom. With a background in filmmaking, art, and social work, Nico brings artistic expression and sensitivity to storytelling and outreach, and manages local field teams and the greenhouse alongside Andres.

Nicholas Busciglio
Grounds Manager Founder

Adopted into the ancestral lands of the Kamëntsá people, Nico bridges modern mindsets with ancestral wisdom. With a background in filmmaking, art, and social work, Nico brings artistic expression and sensitivity to storytelling and outreach, and manages local field teams and the greenhouse alongside Andres.

Nicholas Busciglio
Grounds Manager Founder

Adopted into the ancestral lands of the Kamëntsá people, Nico bridges modern mindsets with ancestral wisdom. With a background in filmmaking, art, and social work, Nico brings artistic expression and sensitivity to storytelling and outreach, and manages local field teams and the greenhouse alongside Andres.

Rye Lee
Story, Web

Vocationally experienced in early-stage startup software design (Dropbox, Asana) and grantwriting ($1.2M), Rye looks to apply her skills to meaningful, impactful work around ecology, permaculture, natural medicines, and ecovillages. Communes with CSN/OIOC since 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Story, Web

Vocationally experienced in early-stage startup software design (Dropbox, Asana) and grantwriting ($1.2M), Rye looks to apply her skills to meaningful, impactful work around ecology, permaculture, natural medicines, and ecovillages. Communes with CSN/OIOC since 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Story, Web

Vocationally experienced in early-stage startup software design (Dropbox, Asana) and grantwriting ($1.2M), Rye looks to apply her skills to meaningful, impactful work around ecology, permaculture, natural medicines, and ecovillages. Communes with CSN/OIOC since 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Story, Web

Vocationally experienced in early-stage startup software design (Dropbox, Asana) and grantwriting ($1.2M), Rye looks to apply her skills to meaningful, impactful work around ecology, permaculture, natural medicines, and ecovillages. Communes with CSN/OIOC since 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Story, Web

Vocationally experienced in early-stage startup software design (Dropbox, Asana) and grantwriting ($1.2M), Rye looks to apply her skills to meaningful, impactful work around ecology, permaculture, natural medicines, and ecovillages. Communes with CSN/OIOC since 2016/2022.

Benito Chasoy
Reforestation Lead

Indigenous to the Andean forest, Benito learned tree cultivation and ecological diversity from his father. With 15+ years managing greenhouses and reforestation, he specializes in ecosystem rehabilitation and landscape mitigation with terrain-specific tree planting. Benito has provided trees and guidance for OIOC since 2022.

Benito Chasoy
Reforestation Lead

Indigenous to the Andean forest, Benito learned tree cultivation and ecological diversity from his father. With 15+ years managing greenhouses and reforestation, he specializes in ecosystem rehabilitation and landscape mitigation with terrain-specific tree planting. Benito has provided trees and guidance for OIOC since 2022.

Benito Chasoy
Reforestation Lead

Indigenous to the Andean forest, Benito learned tree cultivation and ecological diversity from his father. With 15+ years managing greenhouses and reforestation, he specializes in ecosystem rehabilitation and landscape mitigation with terrain-specific tree planting. Benito has provided trees and guidance for OIOC since 2022.

Benito Chasoy
Reforestation Lead

Indigenous to the Andean forest, Benito learned tree cultivation and ecological diversity from his father. With 15+ years managing greenhouses and reforestation, he specializes in ecosystem rehabilitation and landscape mitigation with terrain-specific tree planting. Benito has provided trees and guidance for OIOC since 2022.

Benito Chasoy
Reforestation Lead

Indigenous to the Andean forest, Benito learned tree cultivation and ecological diversity from his father. With 15+ years managing greenhouses and reforestation, he specializes in ecosystem rehabilitation and landscape mitigation with terrain-specific tree planting. Benito has provided trees and guidance for OIOC since 2022.

Andres Salazar
Environmental Engineer

With 10+ years in environmental education and organic farming, Andres brings pragmatic sustainable practices to our projects, like soil mineralization and natural cultivation. He’s rehabilitated and nurtured OIOC’s first small scale reforestation effort in 2023, and tends to OIOC’s greenhouse full time.

Andres Salazar
Environmental Engineer

With 10+ years in environmental education and organic farming, Andres brings pragmatic sustainable practices to our projects, like soil mineralization and natural cultivation. He’s rehabilitated and nurtured OIOC’s first small scale reforestation effort in 2023, and tends to OIOC’s greenhouse full time.

Andres Salazar
Environmental Engineer

With 10+ years in environmental education and organic farming, Andres brings pragmatic sustainable practices to our projects, like soil mineralization and natural cultivation. He’s rehabilitated and nurtured OIOC’s first small scale reforestation effort in 2023, and tends to OIOC’s greenhouse full time.

Andres Salazar
Environmental Engineer

With 10+ years in environmental education and organic farming, Andres brings pragmatic sustainable practices to our projects, like soil mineralization and natural cultivation. He’s rehabilitated and nurtured OIOC’s first small scale reforestation effort in 2023, and tends to OIOC’s greenhouse full time.

Andres Salazar
Environmental Engineer

With 10+ years in environmental education and organic farming, Andres brings pragmatic sustainable practices to our projects, like soil mineralization and natural cultivation. He’s rehabilitated and nurtured OIOC’s first small scale reforestation effort in 2023, and tends to OIOC’s greenhouse full time.

Rye Lee
Story, Web

Rye has raised $1.2M for non-profits, and brings experience from early-stage software design (Dropbox, Asana) and grant writing to assist with operations, storytelling, and web presence. Ally to ecology, permaculture, and natural medicines. Communes with CSN/OIOC since 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Story, Web

Rye has raised $1.2M for non-profits, and brings experience from early-stage software design (Dropbox, Asana) and grant writing to assist with operations, storytelling, and web presence. Ally to ecology, permaculture, and natural medicines. Communes with CSN/OIOC since 2016/2022.

¹ The Sibundoy Valley currently has 18 remnants of wetlands which, due to their geographical location and fauna, are of international importance. It is an inter-Andean valley, a transition zone to the Amazon with high biodiversity in flora and fauna, covered with grasslands, frailejon moorlands, shrubs, water mirrors, and extensive peatlands. Endangered bird species are still found in this area, as well as transcontinental birds such as the Canadian Duck (Anas discors), serving as temporary resting sites or arrival points while passing through the winter season in the departing countries. (Environmental Management Plan for the Wetlands of Sibundoy Valley. Corporation for Sustainable Development of Southern Amazon. https://www.corpoamazonia.gov.co/images/Publicaciones/30%202006_PMA_Humedales_Valle_Sibundoy/2006_PMA_humedales_Valle_de_sibundoy.pdf 2006)

² [Ayahuasca and …] the combined action of the two plants has been empirically understood by Amazonian indigenous populations for at least 3000 years. Originally used by Amazonian shamans in ritual ceremonies and by folk healers for a variety of psychosomatic complaints, worldwide interest in ayahuasca has been rising. (Ayahuasca: Psychological and Physiologic Effects, Pharmacology and Potential Uses in Addiction and Mental Illness. Current Neuropharmacology, 2019. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343205/#r5)

³ A study by the Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute (IGAC) revealed a significant disappearance of forest, wetland and swamp areas due to livestock activity. Of the 9,482.5 hectares studied, 83.8% is made up of pastures for livestock production. Environmental conservation areas have been reduced to only 3%, when they should be 30%. (Livestock farming devours environmental treasures of Sibundoy Valley. Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute. https://antiguo.igac.gov.co/es/noticias/la-ganaderia-se-ha-devorado-gran-parte-de-los-tesoros-ambientales-del-valle-del-sibundoy)

⁴ https://colaboracion.dnp.gov.co/CDT/Desarrollo%20Territorial/Fichas%20Caracterizacion%20Territorial/Putumayo_Sibundoy%20ficha.pdf

© 2023 OIOC. All rights reserved.

¹ The Sibundoy Valley currently has 18 remnants of wetlands which, due to their geographical location and fauna, are of international importance. It is an inter-Andean valley, a transition zone to the Amazon with high biodiversity in flora and fauna, covered with grasslands, frailejon moorlands, shrubs, water mirrors, and extensive peatlands. Endangered bird species are still found in this area, as well as transcontinental birds such as the Canadian Duck (Anas discors), serving as temporary resting sites or arrival points while passing through the winter season in the departing countries. (Environmental Management Plan for the Wetlands of Sibundoy Valley. Corporation for Sustainable Development of Southern Amazon. https://www.corpoamazonia.gov.co/images/Publicaciones/30%202006_PMA_Humedales_Valle_Sibundoy/2006_PMA_humedales_Valle_de_sibundoy.pdf 2006)

² [Ayahuasca and …] the combined action of the two plants has been empirically understood by Amazonian indigenous populations for at least 3000 years. Originally used by Amazonian shamans in ritual ceremonies and by folk healers for a variety of psychosomatic complaints, worldwide interest in ayahuasca has been rising. (Ayahuasca: Psychological and Physiologic Effects, Pharmacology and Potential Uses in Addiction and Mental Illness. Current Neuropharmacology, 2019. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343205/#r5)

³ A study by the Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute (IGAC) revealed a significant disappearance of forest, wetland and swamp areas due to livestock activity. Of the 9,482.5 hectares studied, 83.8% is made up of pastures for livestock production. Environmental conservation areas have been reduced to only 3%, when they should be 30%. (Livestock farming devours environmental treasures of Sibundoy Valley. Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute. https://antiguo.igac.gov.co/es/noticias/la-ganaderia-se-ha-devorado-gran-parte-de-los-tesoros-ambientales-del-valle-del-sibundoy)

⁴ https://colaboracion.dnp.gov.co/CDT/Desarrollo%20Territorial/Fichas%20Caracterizacion%20Territorial/Putumayo_Sibundoy%20ficha.pdf

© 2023 OIOC. All rights reserved.

¹ The Sibundoy Valley currently has 18 remnants of wetlands which, due to their geographical location and fauna, are of international importance. It is an inter-Andean valley, a transition zone to the Amazon with high biodiversity in flora and fauna, covered with grasslands, frailejon moorlands, shrubs, water mirrors, and extensive peatlands. Endangered bird species are still found in this area, as well as transcontinental birds such as the Canadian Duck (Anas discors), serving as temporary resting sites or arrival points while passing through the winter season in the departing countries. (Environmental Management Plan for the Wetlands of Sibundoy Valley. Corporation for Sustainable Development of Southern Amazon, 2006 https://www.corpoamazonia.gov.co/images/Publicaciones/30%202006_PMA_Humedales_Valle_Sibundoy/2006_PMA_humedales_Valle_de_sibundoy.pdf)

² [Ayahuasca and …] the combined action of the two plants has been empirically understood by Amazonian indigenous populations for at least 3000 years. Originally used by Amazonian shamans in ritual ceremonies and by folk healers for a variety of psychosomatic complaints, worldwide interest in ayahuasca has been rising. (Ayahuasca: Psychological and Physiologic Effects, Pharmacology and Potential Uses in Addiction and Mental Illness. Current Neuropharmacology, 2019. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343205/#r5)

³ A study by the Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute (IGAC) revealed a significant disappearance of forest, wetland and swamp areas due to livestock activity. Of the 9,482.5 hectares studied, 83.8% is made up of pastures for livestock production. Environmental conservation areas have been reduced to only 3%, when they should be 30%. (Livestock farming devours environmental treasures of Sibundoy Valley. Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute. https://antiguo.igac.gov.co/es/noticias/la-ganaderia-se-ha-devorado-gran-parte-de-los-tesoros-ambientales-del-valle-del-sibundoy)

⁴ https://colaboracion.dnp.gov.co/CDT/Desarrollo%20Territorial/Fichas%20Caracterizacion%20Territorial/Putumayo_Sibundoy%20ficha.pdf

© 2023 OIOC. All rights reserved.

¹ The Sibundoy Valley currently has 18 remnants of wetlands which, due to their geographical location and fauna, are of international importance. It is an inter-Andean valley, a transition zone to the Amazon with high biodiversity in flora and fauna, covered with grasslands, frailejon moorlands, shrubs, water mirrors, and extensive peatlands. Endangered bird species are still found in this area, as well as transcontinental birds such as the Canadian Duck (Anas discors), serving as temporary resting sites or arrival points while passing through the winter season in the departing countries. (Environmental Management Plan for the Wetlands of Sibundoy Valley. Corporation for Sustainable Development of Southern Amazon, 2006 https://www.corpoamazonia.gov.co/images/Publicaciones/30%202006_PMA_Humedales_Valle_Sibundoy/2006_PMA_humedales_Valle_de_sibundoy.pdf)

² [Ayahuasca and …] the combined action of the two plants has been empirically understood by Amazonian indigenous populations for at least 3000 years. Originally used by Amazonian shamans in ritual ceremonies and by folk healers for a variety of psychosomatic complaints, worldwide interest in ayahuasca has been rising. (Ayahuasca: Psychological and Physiologic Effects, Pharmacology and Potential Uses in Addiction and Mental Illness. Current Neuropharmacology, 2019. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343205/#r5)

³ A study by the Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute (IGAC) revealed a significant disappearance of forest, wetland and swamp areas due to livestock activity. Of the 9,482.5 hectares studied, 83.8% is made up of pastures for livestock production. Environmental conservation areas have been reduced to only 3%, when they should be 30%. (Livestock farming devours environmental treasures of Sibundoy Valley. Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute. https://antiguo.igac.gov.co/es/noticias/la-ganaderia-se-ha-devorado-gran-parte-de-los-tesoros-ambientales-del-valle-del-sibundoy)

⁴ https://colaboracion.dnp.gov.co/CDT/Desarrollo%20Territorial/Fichas%20Caracterizacion%20Territorial/Putumayo_Sibundoy%20ficha.pdf

© 2023 OIOC. All rights reserved.