Protegiendo tierras sagradas

y bosques.

Protegiendo tierras sagradas
y bosques.

Protegiendo tierras sagradas
y bosques.

Protegiendo tierras sagradas
y bosques.

OIOC fue fundado en la inspiración obtenida de la naturaleza y la necesidad de salvaguardar nuestras tierras y bosques sagrados. Nuestro viaje estudia el vínculo intrínseco entre la preservación del medio ambiente y el bienestar humano. La degradación ambiental conduce a la pobreza y la erosión del equilibrio ecológico tradicional. Estamos comprometidos con soluciones proactivas. Al preservar la sabiduría ancestral y revitalizar las tierras sagradas a través de prácticas regenerativas, sanamos la tierra y elevamos a la comunidad global.

OIOC fue fundado en la inspiración obtenida de la naturaleza y la necesidad de salvaguardar nuestras tierras y bosques sagrados. Nuestro viaje estudia el vínculo intrínseco entre la preservación del medio ambiente y el bienestar humano. La degradación ambiental conduce a la pobreza y la erosión del equilibrio ecológico tradicional. Estamos comprometidos con soluciones proactivas. Al preservar la sabiduría ancestral y revitalizar las tierras sagradas a través de prácticas regenerativas, sanamos la tierra y elevamos a la comunidad global.

OUR VALUES

Connection with Nature and Mother Earth

We value our deep connection with nature and recognize Mother Earth as a sacred entity. We honor and respect the natural world, understanding that our well-being is intricately linked to the planet's health.

We value our deep connection with nature and recognize Mother Earth as a sacred entity. We honor and respect the natural world, understanding that our well-being is intricately linked to the planet's health.

Reciprocity to Kamëntsá Community

OIOC recognizes the centuries of wisdom trialed and passed down through Indigenous culture, from which the modern world benefits. We advocate for ways to give back, support, and uplift Indigenous communities undergoing economic and environmental hardship, their traditions and knowledge base at risk of gradual extinction. We believe in fair and mutually beneficial exchanges, and that ancestral practices around nature, communion, community, and wellness benefit humanity.

OIOC recognizes the centuries of wisdom trialed and passed down through Indigenous culture, from which the modern world benefits. We advocate for ways to give back, support, and uplift Indigenous communities undergoing economic and environmental hardship, their traditions and knowledge base at risk of gradual extinction. We believe in fair and mutually beneficial exchanges, and that ancestral practices around nature, communion, community, and wellness benefit humanity.

Harmonious Relationship with All

We foster harmony and balance in all our relationships, recognizing the interconnectedness of all beings. We approach interactions with empathy, compassion, and understanding, seeking to nurture positive connections with both people and the environment.

We foster harmony and balance in all our relationships, recognizing the interconnectedness of all beings. We approach interactions with empathy, compassion, and understanding, seeking to nurture positive connections with both people and the environment.

Sacredness of Life

We see life as sacred in everyone and everything, honoring all living beings' inherent value and dignity. This reverence for life guides our actions and decisions, inspiring us to act with integrity, kindness, and compassion.

We see life as sacred in everyone and everything, honoring all living beings' inherent value and dignity. This reverence for life guides our actions and decisions, inspiring us to act with integrity, kindness, and compassion.

Family and Community

We value the importance of family and community as the cornerstone of society. We prioritize the well-being of children and elders, recognizing their wisdom, contributions, and the need for their care and support.

We value the importance of family and community as the cornerstone of society. We prioritize the well-being of children and elders, recognizing their wisdom, contributions, and the need for their care and support.

Good Living (Sumak Kawsay)

Guided by the principle of Good Living, or Sumak Kawsay, we lead fulfilling and meaningful lives in harmony with nature and each other. We commit to transparency, integrity, and the pursuit of what is good and just in life, advocating for the well-being of all beings and the planet.

Guided by the principle of Good Living, or Sumak Kawsay, we lead fulfilling and meaningful lives in harmony with nature and each other. We commit to transparency, integrity, and the pursuit of what is good and just in life, advocating for the well-being of all beings and the planet.

TIERRA

Historia del Valle de Sibundoy

ALTO PUTUMAYO, AMAZONAS, COLOMBIA

Historia del Valle de Sibundoy

ALTO PUTUMAYO, AMAZONAS, COLOMBIA

Historia del Valle de Sibundoy

ALTO PUTUMAYO, AMAZONAS, COLOMBIA

Historia del Valle de Sibundoy

ALTO PUTUMAYO, AMAZONAS, COLOMBIA

Sibundoy Valley, an area of 46,938 hectares (116,000 acres) in the department of Alto Putumayo, was historically a large wetland area where only the Inga and Kamëntsá indigenous communities lived.


At that time, the area had many species of flora and fauna, while the indigenous people used ancestral knowledge to subsist on polycultures (diverse crops grown on the same site), also known as “chagras”. It was a territory where man and natural resources coexisted without causing major damage.


In the late 19th century, the arrival of settlers introduced livestock activity in the hillside areas, and initiated human settlements and intense drainage channels to the wetlands to expand the agricultural frontier for monocrops and cattle farming.


This colonization process included redefining and appropriating lands belonging to the Resguardos (conservation sites under indigenous management), where resistance was met with enslavement or violence (burning of settlements, death).


Pressure from international markets for natural resources in the area, such as quinine and rubber, also forced the indigenous population into hard labor and genocide (via measles and influenza, which the indigenous people had no resistance to due to their previous relative isolation).


During this time of new production systems, the conversion to Christianity and the introduction of goods, many indigenous groups struggled to maintain their identity and relationship with the territory. Many cultural elements like their language and oral history survived.


According to a soil survey by Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute (IGAC), whilst 30% of the area was sanctioned for conservation and environmental protection, the reality is that 3% remains of forests, wetlands, and semi-natural areas.


Nieto Escalante, Director of IGAC, suggests that “agricultural, livestock and conservation use have a place, but in a proportionate and controlled way. The Inga and Kamëntsá are the closest to proper agricultural use of the land. These communities still apply ancestral practices such as chagras, which generate self-consumption through polycultures. By working with indigenous communities who know the health of their soil, authorities can develop a roadmap towards food security and mitigating environmental risks.”


In general terms, most Amazonian peoples have developed models of forest management that allow its persistence without radically transforming the vegetation cover. The indigenous people have developed a holistic vision on the environment; they see themselves as intrinsic to their territory, which is perceived in many cases as a sacred living organism that deserves respect. Their relationship with nature is mediated by symbolic concepts around moderated resource use, and balance of energy.


Today, institutions like the World Bank demand participation of local populations in projects related to resource management. OIOC recognizes our rights and an opportunity to work towards autonomous development concerning our sacred lands, values and culture. Our plans are organized around environmental recuperation, community needs, and balanced use of nature and continuity of the forest.


Sources:

  1. Livestock farming devours environmental treasures of Sibundoy Valley. Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute. https://antiguo.igac.gov.co/es/noticias/la-ganaderia-se-ha-devorado-gran-parte-de-los-tesoros-ambientales-del-valle-del-sibundoy

  2. Environmental Management Plan for the Wetlands of Sibundoy Valley. Corporation for Sustainable Development of Southern Amazon. https://www.corpoamazonia.gov.co/images/Publicaciones/30%202006_PMA_Humedales_Valle_Sibundoy/2006_PMA_humedales_Valle_de_sibundoy.pdf

  3. Indigenous Resguardos of Colombia: their contribution to conservation and sustainable forest use. Netherlands Committee for The World Conservation Union, IUCN. https://portals.iucn.org/library/sites/library/files/documents/2003-017.pdf

El Valle de Sibundoy, una zona de 46.938 hectáreas (116.000 acres) en el departamento de Alto Putumayo, históricamente fue un gran humedal donde únicamente vivían las comunidades indígenas Inga y Kamëntsá.


En ese entonces, la zona contaba con muchas especies de flora y fauna, mientras que las personas indígenas utilizaban conocimientos ancestrales para subsistir con policultivos (cultivos diversos cultivados en el mismo sitio), también conocidos como

Sibundoy Valley, an area of 46,938 hectares (116,000 acres) in the department of Alto Putumayo, was historically a large wetland area where only the Inga and Kamëntsá indigenous communities lived.

At that time, the area had many species of flora and fauna, while the indigenous people used ancestral knowledge to subsist on polycultures (diverse crops grown on the same site), also known as “chagras”. It was a territory where man and natural resources coexisted without causing major damage.

In the late 19th century, the arrival of settlers introduced livestock activity in the hillside areas, and initiated human settlements and intense drainage channels to the wetlands to expand the agricultural frontier for monocrops and cattle farming.

This colonization process included redefining and appropriating lands belonging to the Resguardos (conservation sites under indigenous management), where resistance was met with enslavement or violence (burning of settlements, death).

Pressure from international markets for natural resources in the area, such as quinine and rubber, also forced the indigenous population into hard labor and genocide (via measles and influenza, which the indigenous people had no resistance to due to their previous relative isolation).

During this time of new production systems, the conversion to Christianity and the introduction of goods, many indigenous groups struggled to maintain their identity and relationship with the territory. Many cultural elements like their language and oral history survived.

According to a soil survey by Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute (IGAC), whilst 30% of the area was sanctioned for conservation and environmental protection, the reality is that 3% remains of forests, wetlands, and semi-natural areas.

Nieto Escalante, Director of IGAC, suggests that “agricultural, livestock and conservation use have a place, but in a proportionate and controlled way. The Inga and Kamëntsá are the closest to proper agricultural use of the land. These communities still apply ancestral practices such as chagras, which generate self-consumption through polycultures. By working with indigenous communities who know the health of their soil, authorities can develop a roadmap towards food security and mitigating environmental risks.”

In general terms, most Amazonian peoples have developed models of forest management that allow its persistence without radically transforming the vegetation cover. The indigenous people have developed a holistic vision on the environment; they see themselves as intrinsic to their territory, which is perceived in many cases as a sacred living organism that deserves respect. Their relationship with nature is mediated by symbolic concepts around moderated resource use, and balance of energy.

Today, institutions like the World Bank demand participation of local populations in projects related to resource management. OIOC recognizes our rights and an opportunity to work towards autonomous development concerning our sacred lands, values and culture. Our plans are organized around environmental recuperation, community needs, and balanced use of nature and continuity of the forest.

Sources:

  1. Livestock farming devours environmental treasures of Sibundoy Valley. Agustín Codazzi Geographic Institute. https://antiguo.igac.gov.co/es/noticias/la-ganaderia-se-ha-devorado-gran-parte-de-los-tesoros-ambientales-del-valle-del-sibundoy

  2. Environmental Management Plan for the Wetlands of Sibundoy Valley. Corporation for Sustainable Development of Southern Amazon. https://www.corpoamazonia.gov.co/images/Publicaciones/30%202006_PMA_Humedales_Valle_Sibundoy/2006_PMA_humedales_Valle_de_sibundoy.pdf

  3. Indigenous Resguardos of Colombia: their contribution to conservation and sustainable forest use. Netherlands Committee for The World Conservation Union, IUCN. https://portals.iucn.org/library/sites/library/files/documents/2003-017.pdf

CULTURA

Nación Indígena de Kamëntsá

Nación Indígena de Kamëntsá

Nación Indígena de Kamëntsá

Kamentsa Woven Art
Kamentsa Woven Art
Kamentsa Woven Art
Kamentsa Woven Art

Cultura Kamëntsá

Cultura Kamëntsá

El pueblo Kamëntsá es un grupo indígena que reside en el Valle de Sibundoy, Putumayo.

La sociedad está organizada en torno a un estilo de vida comunitario, con énfasis en la cooperación y la ayuda mutua dentro de la comunidad.

Sus creencias espirituales están arraigadas en la sacralidad de la naturaleza y la interconexión de todos los seres vivos.

Su reverencia por la naturaleza y la comunidad se refleja en la agricultura y el chamanismo. El cultivo de maíz, papas y hojas de coca tiene un significado espiritual.

El atuendo tradicional incluye prendas tejidas de colores brillantes adornadas con patrones y símbolos que reflejan su identidad cultural y sus creencias espirituales.

El pueblo Kamëntsá es un grupo indígena que reside en el Valle de Sibundoy, Putumayo.

La sociedad está organizada en torno a un estilo de vida comunitario, con énfasis en la cooperación y la ayuda mutua dentro de la comunidad.

Sus creencias espirituales están arraigadas en la sacralidad de la naturaleza y la interconexión de todos los seres vivos.

Su reverencia por la naturaleza y la comunidad se refleja en la agricultura y el chamanismo. El cultivo de maíz, papas y hojas de coca tiene un significado espiritual.

El atuendo tradicional incluye prendas tejidas de colores brillantes adornadas con patrones y símbolos que reflejan su identidad cultural y sus creencias espirituales.

Respeto por la naturaleza y la comunidad

Respeto por la naturaleza y la comunidad

Las ceremonias de la medicina ancestral y la sabiduría tradicional se transmiten a través de generaciones de linajes familiares. Los hombres y mujeres de la medicina tradicional trabajan con Ayahuasca y más de 350 plantas medicinales, muchas de ellas únicas en el territorio, elaborando baños y tónicos de remedios herbales para necesidades individuales. Estudios antropológicos y geográficos rastrean el uso de Ayahuasca a más de 10,000 años atrás.

Los chamanes sirven como líderes espirituales y sanadores que se comunican con el mundo espiritual para mantener el equilibrio en el mundo natural.

A través de rituales y ceremonias, honran a sus antepasados, celebran los ciclos de la vida y ofrecen homenajes al mundo espiritual.

Las ceremonias de la medicina ancestral y la sabiduría tradicional se transmiten a través de generaciones de linajes familiares. Los hombres y mujeres de la medicina tradicional trabajan con Ayahuasca y más de 350 plantas medicinales, muchas de ellas únicas en el territorio, elaborando baños y tónicos de remedios herbales para necesidades individuales. Estudios antropológicos y geográficos rastrean el uso de Ayahuasca a más de 10,000 años atrás.

Los chamanes sirven como líderes espirituales y sanadores que se comunican con el mundo espiritual para mantener el equilibrio en el mundo natural.

A través de rituales y ceremonias, honran a sus antepasados, celebran los ciclos de la vida y ofrecen homenajes al mundo espiritual.

EQUIPO

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Gobernador tribal Kamentsa Fundador

3 veces gobernador de la nación Kamëntsá. Indígena de nacimiento, con más de 40 años de experiencia con medicinas amazónicas, descendiente de Yageceros tradicionales. Taita Juan está profundamente conectado con el mundo natural y comprometido con su conservación, dedicando toda su vida a la defensa de los pueblos indígenas y la preservación de las medicinas naturales y los ecosistemas, a través de su trabajo en OIOC, Shanayoy, a nivel regional y dando conferencias en el extranjero.

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Gobernador tribal Kamentsa Fundador

3 veces gobernador de la nación Kamëntsá. Indígena de nacimiento, con más de 40 años de experiencia con medicinas amazónicas, descendiente de Yageceros tradicionales. Taita Juan está profundamente conectado con el mundo natural y comprometido con su conservación, dedicando toda su vida a la defensa de los pueblos indígenas y la preservación de las medicinas naturales y los ecosistemas, a través de su trabajo en OIOC, Shanayoy, a nivel regional y dando conferencias en el extranjero.

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Gobernador tribal Kamentsa Fundador

3 veces gobernador de la nación Kamëntsá. Indígena de nacimiento, con más de 40 años de experiencia con medicinas amazónicas, descendiente de Yageceros tradicionales. Taita Juan está profundamente conectado con el mundo natural y comprometido con su conservación, dedicando toda su vida a la defensa de los pueblos indígenas y la preservación de las medicinas naturales y los ecosistemas, a través de su trabajo en OIOC, Shanayoy, a nivel regional y dando conferencias en el extranjero.

Taita Juan Bautista Agreda
Gobernador tribal Kamentsa Fundador

3 veces gobernador de la nación Kamëntsá. Indígena de nacimiento, con más de 40 años de experiencia con medicinas amazónicas, descendiente de Yageceros tradicionales. Taita Juan está profundamente conectado con el mundo natural y comprometido con su conservación, dedicando toda su vida a la defensa de los pueblos indígenas y la preservación de las medicinas naturales y los ecosistemas, a través de su trabajo en OIOC, Shanayoy, a nivel regional y dando conferencias en el extranjero.

Erika Salazar
Operaciones, Alcance, Comunidad Fundador

20+ años estudiando las tradiciones y la gente de los Andes. Estudió las Plantas Maestras bajo el Taita Juan, organizó trabajo sin fines de lucro para la región desde 2011. Sintonizada con el mundo natural, Erika lidera el latido del corazón de la organización, desde la planificación operativa local hasta el alcance internacional. Herbalista Médica (Tradición Vitalista), Terapeuta Holística (Universidad Esneca, España), Ministra (Iglesia de la Naturaleza Sagrada).

Erika Salazar
Operaciones, Alcance, Comunidad Fundador

20+ años estudiando las tradiciones y la gente de los Andes. Estudió las Plantas Maestras bajo el Taita Juan, organizó trabajo sin fines de lucro para la región desde 2011. Sintonizada con el mundo natural, Erika lidera el latido del corazón de la organización, desde la planificación operativa local hasta el alcance internacional. Herbalista Médica (Tradición Vitalista), Terapeuta Holística (Universidad Esneca, España), Ministra (Iglesia de la Naturaleza Sagrada).

Erika Salazar
Operaciones, Alcance, Comunidad Fundador

20+ años estudiando las tradiciones y la gente de los Andes. Estudió las Plantas Maestras bajo el Taita Juan, organizó trabajo sin fines de lucro para la región desde 2011. Sintonizada con el mundo natural, Erika lidera el latido del corazón de la organización, desde la planificación operativa local hasta el alcance internacional. Herbalista Médica (Tradición Vitalista), Terapeuta Holística (Universidad Esneca, España), Ministra (Iglesia de la Naturaleza Sagrada).

Erika Salazar
Operaciones, Alcance, Comunidad Fundador

20+ años estudiando las tradiciones y la gente de los Andes. Estudió las Plantas Maestras bajo el Taita Juan, organizó trabajo sin fines de lucro para la región desde 2011. Sintonizada con el mundo natural, Erika lidera el latido del corazón de la organización, desde la planificación operativa local hasta el alcance internacional. Herbalista Médica (Tradición Vitalista), Terapeuta Holística (Universidad Esneca, España), Ministra (Iglesia de la Naturaleza Sagrada).

Nicholas Busciglio
Gerente de terrenos Fundador

Adoptado en las tierras ancestrales del pueblo Kamëntsá, Nico conecta mentalidades modernas con sabiduría ancestral. Con experiencia en cine, arte y trabajo social, Nico aporta expresión artística y sensibilidad a la narración y divulgación, y dirige equipos locales e invernaderos junto a Andrés.

Nicholas Busciglio
Gerente de terrenos Fundador

Adoptado en las tierras ancestrales del pueblo Kamëntsá, Nico conecta mentalidades modernas con sabiduría ancestral. Con experiencia en cine, arte y trabajo social, Nico aporta expresión artística y sensibilidad a la narración y divulgación, y dirige equipos locales e invernaderos junto a Andrés.

Nicholas Busciglio
Gerente de terrenos Fundador

Adoptado en las tierras ancestrales del pueblo Kamëntsá, Nico conecta mentalidades modernas con sabiduría ancestral. Con experiencia en cine, arte y trabajo social, Nico aporta expresión artística y sensibilidad a la narración y divulgación, y dirige equipos locales e invernaderos junto a Andrés.

Nicholas Busciglio
Gerente de terrenos Fundador

Adoptado en las tierras ancestrales del pueblo Kamëntsá, Nico conecta mentalidades modernas con sabiduría ancestral. Con experiencia en cine, arte y trabajo social, Nico aporta expresión artística y sensibilidad a la narración y divulgación, y dirige equipos locales e invernaderos junto a Andrés.

Mercedes Agreda
Educador de la comunidad

Miembro orgullosa de la comunidad Kamëntsá, Mercedes encarna un profundo respeto por la tierra y nuestros elementos sagrados. Educadora comunitaria desde 2016, ofrece programas sobre medicinas ancestrales, artes y cultura tradicionales, y conservación de tierras a la comunidad local. Estudiante de la facultad de Madre Tierra en la Universidad Nacional.

Mercedes Agreda
Educador de la comunidad

Miembro orgullosa de la comunidad Kamëntsá, Mercedes encarna un profundo respeto por la tierra y nuestros elementos sagrados. Educadora comunitaria desde 2016, ofrece programas sobre medicinas ancestrales, artes y cultura tradicionales, y conservación de tierras a la comunidad local. Estudiante de la facultad de Madre Tierra en la Universidad Nacional.

Mercedes Agreda
Educador de la comunidad

Miembro orgullosa de la comunidad Kamëntsá, Mercedes encarna un profundo respeto por la tierra y nuestros elementos sagrados. Educadora comunitaria desde 2016, ofrece programas sobre medicinas ancestrales, artes y cultura tradicionales, y conservación de tierras a la comunidad local. Estudiante de la facultad de Madre Tierra en la Universidad Nacional.

Mercedes Agreda
Educador de la comunidad

Miembro orgullosa de la comunidad Kamëntsá, Mercedes encarna un profundo respeto por la tierra y nuestros elementos sagrados. Educadora comunitaria desde 2016, ofrece programas sobre medicinas ancestrales, artes y cultura tradicionales, y conservación de tierras a la comunidad local. Estudiante de la facultad de Madre Tierra en la Universidad Nacional.

Andres Salazar
Ingeniero Ambiental

Con más de 10 años de experiencia en educación ambiental y agricultura orgánica, Andrés aporta prácticas sostenibles pragmáticas a nuestros proyectos, como la mineralización del suelo y el cultivo natural. Ha rehabilitado y cuidado el primer esfuerzo de reforestación a pequeña escala de OIOC en 2023, y se dedica a tiempo completo al invernadero de OIOC.

Andres Salazar
Ingeniero Ambiental

Con más de 10 años de experiencia en educación ambiental y agricultura orgánica, Andrés aporta prácticas sostenibles pragmáticas a nuestros proyectos, como la mineralización del suelo y el cultivo natural. Ha rehabilitado y cuidado el primer esfuerzo de reforestación a pequeña escala de OIOC en 2023, y se dedica a tiempo completo al invernadero de OIOC.

Andres Salazar
Ingeniero Ambiental

Con más de 10 años de experiencia en educación ambiental y agricultura orgánica, Andrés aporta prácticas sostenibles pragmáticas a nuestros proyectos, como la mineralización del suelo y el cultivo natural. Ha rehabilitado y cuidado el primer esfuerzo de reforestación a pequeña escala de OIOC en 2023, y se dedica a tiempo completo al invernadero de OIOC.

Andres Salazar
Ingeniero Ambiental

Con más de 10 años de experiencia en educación ambiental y agricultura orgánica, Andrés aporta prácticas sostenibles pragmáticas a nuestros proyectos, como la mineralización del suelo y el cultivo natural. Ha rehabilitado y cuidado el primer esfuerzo de reforestación a pequeña escala de OIOC en 2023, y se dedica a tiempo completo al invernadero de OIOC.

Benito Chasoy
Líder de Reforestación

Originario del bosque andino, Benito aprendió el cultivo de árboles y la diversidad ecológica de su padre. Con más de 15 años administrando invernaderos y reforestación, se especializa en la rehabilitación del ecosistema y la mitigación del paisaje con la plantación de árboles específicos del terreno. Benito ha proporcionado árboles y orientación para OIOC desde el 2022.

Benito Chasoy
Líder de Reforestación

Originario del bosque andino, Benito aprendió el cultivo de árboles y la diversidad ecológica de su padre. Con más de 15 años administrando invernaderos y reforestación, se especializa en la rehabilitación del ecosistema y la mitigación del paisaje con la plantación de árboles específicos del terreno. Benito ha proporcionado árboles y orientación para OIOC desde el 2022.

Benito Chasoy
Líder de Reforestación

Originario del bosque andino, Benito aprendió el cultivo de árboles y la diversidad ecológica de su padre. Con más de 15 años administrando invernaderos y reforestación, se especializa en la rehabilitación del ecosistema y la mitigación del paisaje con la plantación de árboles específicos del terreno. Benito ha proporcionado árboles y orientación para OIOC desde el 2022.

Benito Chasoy
Líder de Reforestación

Originario del bosque andino, Benito aprendió el cultivo de árboles y la diversidad ecológica de su padre. Con más de 15 años administrando invernaderos y reforestación, se especializa en la rehabilitación del ecosistema y la mitigación del paisaje con la plantación de árboles específicos del terreno. Benito ha proporcionado árboles y orientación para OIOC desde el 2022.

Rye Lee
Historia, Web

Experimentada vocacionalmente en el diseño de software para startups en etapas iniciales (Dropbox, Asana) y escritura de subvenciones ($1.2M), Rye busca aplicar sus habilidades en trabajos significativos e impactantes relacionados con la ecología, la permacultura, las medicinas naturales y las ecovillas. Convive con CSN/OIOC desde 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Historia, Web

Experimentada vocacionalmente en el diseño de software para startups en etapas iniciales (Dropbox, Asana) y escritura de subvenciones ($1.2M), Rye busca aplicar sus habilidades en trabajos significativos e impactantes relacionados con la ecología, la permacultura, las medicinas naturales y las ecovillas. Convive con CSN/OIOC desde 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Historia, Web

Experimentada vocacionalmente en el diseño de software para startups en etapas iniciales (Dropbox, Asana) y escritura de subvenciones ($1.2M), Rye busca aplicar sus habilidades en trabajos significativos e impactantes relacionados con la ecología, la permacultura, las medicinas naturales y las ecovillas. Convive con CSN/OIOC desde 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Historia, Web

Experimentada vocacionalmente en el diseño de software para startups en etapas iniciales (Dropbox, Asana) y escritura de subvenciones ($1.2M), Rye busca aplicar sus habilidades en trabajos significativos e impactantes relacionados con la ecología, la permacultura, las medicinas naturales y las ecovillas. Convive con CSN/OIOC desde 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Historia, Web

Rye ha recaudado $1.2M para organizaciones sin fines de lucro y aporta experiencia en diseño de software en etapa temprana (Dropbox, Asana) y redacción de subvenciones para ayudar con operaciones, narración y presencia web. Aliada de la ecología, la permacultura y las medicinas naturales. Comunica con CSN/OIOC desde 2016/2022.

Rye Lee
Historia, Web

Rye ha recaudado $1.2M para organizaciones sin fines de lucro y aporta experiencia en diseño de software en etapa temprana (Dropbox, Asana) y redacción de subvenciones para ayudar con operaciones, narración y presencia web. Aliada de la ecología, la permacultura y las medicinas naturales. Comunica con CSN/OIOC desde 2016/2022.

Join our newsletter for project and community updates.

+57-3128468682

© 2023 OIOC. All rights reserved.

Join our newsletter for project updates.

+57-3128468682

© 2023 OIOC. All rights reserved.